theatlantic:

Prices Are People: A Short History of Working and Spending Money

Over the next month, we’re putting together a special report, the Money Report, about how and why we spend what we do. Economics is so often the economist-eye view of the world. We’re out to recreate the consumer-eye view of the world. We’re interested in what things cost, why they cost that much, and why they’re getting more expensive and less expensive. If you’ve got awesome and surprising stories about prices, costs and the flow of money, leave us a tip in the comment section. 
To kick things off, we’d like to very briefly introduce one of the themes of the Money Report: Prices are people. […]
Across the 20th century, the labor force has shifted from farmers and foresters to manufacturers and then to professional and service workers. In 1900, we spent much of our manpower growing food and feeding ourselves. By 1950, the major economic industries were manufacturing and construction. But today’s labor economy revolves around services, not products.
Read more. [Image: Kiss Me, I’m Polish]

theatlantic:

Prices Are People: A Short History of Working and Spending Money

Over the next month, we’re putting together a special report, the Money Report, about how and why we spend what we do. Economics is so often the economist-eye view of the world. We’re out to recreate the consumer-eye view of the world. We’re interested in what things cost, why they cost that much, and why they’re getting more expensive and less expensive. If you’ve got awesome and surprising stories about prices, costs and the flow of money, leave us a tip in the comment section. 

To kick things off, we’d like to very briefly introduce one of the themes of the Money Report: Prices are people. […]

Across the 20th century, the labor force has shifted from farmers and foresters to manufacturers and then to professional and service workers. In 1900, we spent much of our manpower growing food and feeding ourselves. By 1950, the major economic industries were manufacturing and construction. But today’s labor economy revolves around services, not products.

Read more. [Image: Kiss Me, I’m Polish]